Flamenco Bulerias


The Buleria, or Bulerias in plural, is a derivative style of the flamenco palo group SoleBuleria flamenco rhythm compasa, sharing the same rhythmic patterns but much faster, going up to 300 beats per minute. The name Bulerias is derived from the Spanish word burlar, meaning "to mock" or bullería, meaning tumult or commotion. So, the Buleria is a festive and happy palo, initially used to finish off songs in other styles, such as the solea or Alegrias, as a kind of finale increasing the speed inspired by loud expressions and encouragement. At the end of the 19th century, Bulerias was so popular, becoming a form or palos at its own.

The 12 beats rhythmic pattern, or compas, of the Buleria is marked by accented claps and guitar playing in two different ways:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Although it is allowed to perform the Buleria at a high level of improvisation, usually the Buleria starts on the 12th beat of the compas, preceeded by a llamada and ending with a finale when the dancer returns to his original position in the circle. Absolute control of the off beats is required. Dancers combined numerous dance steps and rhythmic combination of sounds with the sole and heel of the foot, expressing themselves very lively with their arms, body and faces. Jerez de la Frontera is the true home of the bulerias, although their core region also includes Utrera and Cadiz. The Buleria singing is based on its coplas; or poetic, lyrical verses, having three or four eight syllable verses.