Solea flamenco palo


The Solea is one of the most appreciated flamenco palos, comprising a high number of traditional songs, a fascinating melodic richness and a touching depth of performances. The solea, along with the Seguiriya, is considered to be the core of the old Cante jondo, the most profound and deepest flamenco vocal style. The name Solea is derived from one of the early flamenco lyrics of these songs, referring to the Spanish word 'la soledad', the desolated loneliness of the ever wandering Gypsy soul. Many consider the Solea as the mother of all flamenco. The compelling Solea lyrics summon touching feelings inspired by daily life, tragic, love and death. The Solea evolved, along the axis of Cadiz, Jerez and Seville, from accompanying a Jaleo style dance style, becoming a palo on its own in the mid 19th century. There are several variations of true soleares, such as the ones from Triana, Jerez, Alcalá de Guadaira, Lebrija, Utrera, Cadiz and Los Puertos.

The compas of the solea is one of the most widely used in Flamenco. Other palos have derived their compas from the solea, such as the Alegrías, the Mirabras, Caracoles and, to a certain extent, the Bulerías. The Solea compass consists of 12 beats with unusually strong and weak beats in combined 6/8 and 3/4 time signatures, using the typical Andalusian cadence patterns and generally ending on strong beats.

Compas pattern:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12